Sunday, August 30, 2015

On the move

Most people who drive along Highway 526 outside our Everett factory are used to seeing big airplanes. But probably not a giant autoclave.

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The first autoclave for 777X wings heads for home at our new Everett composite wing center. Tim McGuire photo.

The first of three huge autoclaves, measuring 28 feet wide by 120 feet long, was moved on Wednesday night from a site adjacent to Paine Field en route to our new 777X Composite Wing Center. As it crossed the bridge over Highway 526, crews shut down the road temporarily to avoid any distractions.

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It’s not officially on Boeing property until K9 officer Gizmo gives the all clear. Good dog Gizmo, good dog. Photo by Gail Hanusa.

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Crossing the Highway 526 bridge to our Everett factory. Tim Stake photo.

This first autoclave was initially built vertically in 13 sections, called cans. The cans were then assembled into three towers measuring 40 feet tall. All three autoclaves will be the centerpiece of our new Composite Wing Center, a 1.3-million square foot facility that will be roughly the size of 25 football fields. The autoclaves will help us bake sections of the composite wings for the new 777X.

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Talk about an oversize load! Gail Hanusa photo.

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Hurricane Models Have Gotten Way Better Since Katrina

Hurricane Models Have Gotten Way Better Since Katrina

Katrina looked like a pixelated blob in 2005 hurricane models.

The post Hurricane Models Have Gotten Way Better Since Katrina appeared first on WIRED.











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Earth Is Probably Locked Into at Least Three Feet of Sea Level Rise

Global sea levels are expected to rise at least three feet in the coming generations, displacing hundreds of millions of people, NASA said this week. And the space agency is prepared to catalog the disappearance of Earth’s coastlines in rich scientific detail.

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Part of A Rocket Engine Landed in This Guy's Living Room

Part of a rocket engine crashes through the roof of a house in northeast China’s Shanxi province early Friday morning.

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Watch three astronauts repark a Soyuz capsule on the ISS

Even in space, you sometimes have to move your vehicle to a different parking spot. Early Friday morning, half of the astronauts on the ISS will move a Russian Soyuz spacecraft to make room for an incoming capsule — occupied by three additional astronauts — scheduled to dock next week.

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Saturday, August 29, 2015

The 15 Busiest Airline Routes in the World. None are in the US or Europe.

Data for 2015 is available and I find it fascinating what the 15 airline routes with the greatest capacity are for the year.

Continue reading The 15 Busiest Airline Routes in the World. None are in the US or Europe....

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Renault settles on Lotus, to take 65-percent stake in F1 team

Filed under: Motorsports, Renault, Racing

Autosport reports that Renault will return to F1 as a constructor, taking a 65-percent stake in the Lotus team. A top-team budget and ten-year investment is planned.

Continue reading Renault settles on Lotus, to take 65-percent stake in F1 team

Renault settles on Lotus, to take 65-percent stake in F1 team originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 29 Aug 2015 15:29:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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If Our Eyes Could See Wireless Signals, They Wouldn’t Look Like This.

A neat visualization of wireless signals was released last week showing off what our world might look like if we could see radio signals. While it’s an awesome visual effect, it’s really not what we would see. At least not with our puny human eyes.

The app uses data like WiFi hotspots, cell towers, and other wireless devices to create an augmented reality effect showing where the signals are propagating from. Site specific versions of the app also include the wired communication infrastructure as well to give a complete window into the science-fiction-sounding title of “infosphere”.

But like a user on Gizmodo commented, if we could actually see radio signals, they would just be flashes of light. Radio waves are just electromagnetic wavelengths longer than infrared light after all. Though if we could see those wavelengths, what’s the chance we have light speed vision too?

Still. It’s a pretty cool visualization. [Vijen], the creator, says he hopes to release the app to the public after its been exhibited at the ZKM Center of Art and Media in Karlsruhe.

[via Gizmodo]


Filed under: wireless hacks
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Korean Air Celebrates Delivery of its First Boeing 747-8I

Korean Air's new 747-8I glistening during delivery

Korean Air’s new 747-8I glistening during delivery – Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

Earlier this week, at the Everett Delivery Center, Korean Air and Boeing celebrated delivery of the airline’s first of ten 747-8 Intercontinental aircraft. The delivery marked Korean becoming the only carrier of both the freighter and passenger variant, with Korean already operating seven freighters. We were invited to attend the delivery ceremony and it certainly did not disappoint.

Arriving about an hour prior to the ceremony beginning, I had the opportunity to do a little light plane spotting and to chat with some other members of the media. As you can imagine, security is tight at events like this and we had to go through a couple security checks. Once in the delivery center, I was allowed to step out onto the terrace to watch the big 747-8I be towed up to the Delivery Center. As the plane neared, the Korean Air pilots were also outside on the terrace with us. You could tell how excited they were to be a part of this event and to fly this beautiful plane home.

The pilots were very excited to fly home in this beautiful plane! - Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

The pilots were very excited to fly home in this beautiful plane – Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

As soon as the plane arrived, Korean Air and Boeing executives quickly began arriving. The two key attendees were Walter Cho, Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer for Korean Air, and Ray Conner, President and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

After the usual greetings, Mr. Conner and Mr. Cho both thanked each other and cited the long history these two companies have together. Mr. Conner joked that Korean Air had operated nearly every type of the 747, to which Mr. Cho quickly pointed out “even the 747SP!

All smiles at the key exchange - Photo: Colin Cook - AirlineReporter

All smiles at the key exchange – Photo: Colin Cook – AirlineReporter

Mr. Conner handed over the ceremonial keys and cracked another joke, telling Mr. Cho that he should, “try to start the plane with them,” (no, that’s not how it works). At the conclusion of the press conference, it was time to head downstairs for the ribbon cutting ceremony.

As is typical in these events, in addition to the ribbon Boeing had decorated the area with some beautiful flowers. There were also some big gold scissors to cut the ribbon. Following the ceremony, I was excited to get onboard to check out the cabin.

No, you can't buy those scissors at Target - Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

No, you can’t buy those scissors at Target – Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

The new 747-8I is configured with 368 seats across three cabins, including the new First Class Kosmo Suite 2.0 – a newer version of their premium product currently on the Airbus A380. Korean now becomes only the second carrier (in addition to Lufthansa) to operate both the A380 and the 747-8I.

Korean Executive VP Walter Cho checking out the amenities - Photo: Colin Cook |AirlineReporter

Korean Executive VP Walter Cho checking out the amenities – Photo: Colin Cook |AirlineReporter

Up front, the new premium cabin boasts six first class suites, which feature a sliding door passengers can close for more privacy. While not completely enclosed, it certainly allows for a tremendous amount of privacy. Combine that with 24-inch in-flight entertainment system screen and it makes for a great place to spend a long flight.

If you have to “slum it” in business class, the aircraft is equipped with 48 staggered seats with 18-inch touch-screens. Mr. Cho certainly was a great sport, despite all the attention. He quickly sat down in the Kosmo Suite and made himself comfortable, even exploring the amenities within the suite.

Staggered 2-2 Business Class seating upstairs on the 747-8I - Photo: Colin Cook |AirlineReporter

Staggered 2-2 business class seating upstairs on the 747-8I – Photo: Colin Cook |AirlineReporter

Another first for me was going upstairs on the new 747-8I – I’ve flown on a 747-400 before but never upstairs. One thing that particularly struck me was just how long the cabin was on the upper deck. While narrower than the main deck, Korean certainly did a nice job laying out their remaining business class seats (26 are on the main deck and 22 are upstairs).

What does a big plane need? A BIG crew rest area - Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

What does a big plane need? A BIG crew rest area – Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

Another unique opportunity was provided to visit the crew rest area, located at the rear of the main deck. The Boeing delegation initially had a little difficulty locating the code to unlock the crew rest, but both Korean and Boeing had a good laugh about it. Once unlocked, Mr. Cho was the first to take the narrow stairs up to inspect the crew rest.  It was pretty cool to visit the crew rest area and I must admit it would be nice to sleep up there instead of coach on a long flight.

Boeing engineers preparing the 747-8I for departure to Seoul - Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

Boeing engineers preparing the 747-8I for departure to Seoul – Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

Throughout the ceremony and tour it was evident that Korean Air is very focused on being a global airline and one that caters to their high-end clientele, while looking at the bottom line.

“This new aircraft delivers better fuel economy,” Cho said. “That is important to a global airline such as ours. And it supports our goal to build and operate a first-class fleet of world-class aircraft.” He certainly isn’t kidding that this is a premium product designed to take their passengers long-haul. With a nautical range of 7,730 miles, it can connect many distant cities.

Korean Air's Class Kosmo Suite 2.0 - Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

Korean Air’s Class Kosmo Suite 2.0 – Photo: Colin Cook | AirlineReporter

All-in-all, the Korean Air delivery ceremony definitely was a classy affair. The airline has a further 80 Boeing aircraft on order, including nine 747-8I to be delivered.

Korean's 747-8I takes off from Paine Field - Photo: Boeing

Korean’s 747-8I takes off from Paine Field – Photo: Boeing

The 747-8I flew into the sunset that afternoon on the way to Seoul for initial crew testing. Korean Air plans to put it into revenue service at the end of the month.

   Colin Cook – Correspondent 

Colin is an avid AvGeek who works in finance and is based in the Seattle area. He has an immense passion for aviation and loves to travel as much as possible.

 @CRoscoe2121

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Friday, August 28, 2015

Concept Video: Your Next Plane Could Take Off Vertically

TriFan600 Concept Art

TriFan600 Concept Art

XTI Aircraft

The ideal airplane doesn’t need a runway. Since Kitty Hawk, the standard design of a fixed-wing airplane assumes the plane will build momentum and lift by accelerating along an open stretch of land (or sometimes sea), and will need to land by decelerating along a similar smooth path. To free airplanes from runways, they need a different way to get airborne, and in this concept vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) plane from XTI aircraft, promises just that: a business-sized five passenger plane, with tilt-rotor engines that let it fly like a plane but takeoff and land like a helicopter

The video below, from XTI’s crowdfunding campaign, puts their concept squarely at the end of a long chain of airplane evolution:

Video of The Future is Now. Lift Up. Jet Out.

The Denver-based company proposed TriFan 600 plane will seat five passengers, as well as a pilot. They envision an airplane that can travel up to 1,200 miles, with a maximum speed of 400 mph and a cruising altitude of 30,000 feet. Three ducted fans will lift the airplane into the sky in about 90 seconds, and then two of those fans will tile from parallel to perpendicular, propelling the plane forward in the air, no runway required. A sliding door will cover the third fan, so that it doesn’t interfere with the aerodynamics of the plane in flight.

XTI is currently raising money through StartEngine, an “equity crowdfunding platform”, where people interested in buying into the economic future of a business aircraft can reserve shares. If a premium, passenger-carrying VTOL plane seems beyond their budget, businesses can instead look to Sony’s new Aerosense drone, which offers the same kind of take-off and landing ability in a much smaller, wobblier body.

[DesignBoom]

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