Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About US Airline Tail Numbers (Part 2)

I had a lot of great feedback on last week’s post about the aircraft registrations of the big four airlines in the US. Now, we’re going to look at most of the rest. Below you’ll find a discussion about the regionals and low cost cost carriers flying around the country. The regionals in particular tell an interesting story about how airplanes move around between carriers.

Air Wisconsin
Original Photo By redlegsfan21 from Vandalia, OH, United States (N436AWUploaded by russavia) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Original Photo By redlegsfan21 from Vandalia, OH, United States (N436AWUploaded by russavia) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons


Little Air Wisconsin is something of an anomaly in this industry. It was left for dead by United only to find new life with US Airways. But it’s independent and only flies 50 seat jets these days. Its registration scheme? Pretty simple.
  • CRJ-200
    • N4xxAW or ZW

ZW is the airline’s two letter code.

Alaska Airlines (including Horizon)

Alaska may be a fairly big airline, but it hasn’t had any trouble using a uniform template for its airplanes. Its wholly-owned subsidiary Horizon (airline code QX) uses the same style, so I’ve combined them here.
  • Q400 (Horizon)
    • N4xxQX
  • 737-400
    • N7xxAS
  • 737-700
    • N6xxAS
  • 737-800
    • N5xxAS
  • 737-900
    • N3xxAS
  • 737-900ER
    • N4xxAS
Allegiant

With no airplanes being bought new, I always figured Allegiant wouldn’t bother re-registering airplanes. I was wrong. The airline actually has a pretty good system with most new registrations ending in NV. I assume that stands for Nevada.
  • A319
    • N3xxNV
  • MD-80
    • N4xxNV
    • N8xxGA
  • A320
    • N2xxNV
  • 757-200
    • N9xxNV
CommutAir
Original Photo By Andre Wadman [GFDL 1.2 or GFDL 1.2], via Wikimedia Commons

Original Photo By Andre Wadman [GFDL 1.2 or GFDL 1.2], via Wikimedia Commons


If you’ve been delayed on a flight on a United Express Dash 8, then you’ve been flying CommutAir. All of its airplanes have come in second-hand but only those that came from outside the country were re-registered by Comair.
  • Dash 8-200
    • N3xxPH (former Horizon aircraft)
  • Dash 8-300
    • N8xxCA (former Tyrolean aircraft)
Frontier

There’s not a ton to say about Frontier. The airline is down to only two fleet types, so it’s pretty simple. The A318 used to be N8xxFR but those have been retired now.
  • A319
    • N9xxFR
  • A320
    • N2xxFR
Hawaiian (including ‘Ohana)
Original Photo by Me, Myself, and I

Original Photo by Me, Myself, and I


Hawaiian is also pretty straightforward. I’ve included the ‘Ohana by Hawaiian aircraft flown by Empire Airlines here. Those end in HC, which according to spokesperson Alison Croyle stands for Hawaiian Commuter.
  • ATR-42 (‘Ohana by Hawaiian)
    • N8xxHC
  • 717-200
    • N4xxHA
  • 767-300
    • N5xxHA
  • A330-200
    • N3xxHA
JetBlue

JetBlue looks pretty simple at first, but there’s an interesting little twist which I’ll talk about below.
  • Embraer 190
    • N1xxJB
    • N2xxJB
  • N3xxJB
  • A320
  • N5xxJB
  • N6xxJB
  • N7xxJB
  • N8xxJB
  • A321
  • N9xxJB

So what’s the twist? Well, if JetBlue leases out an airplane and then it comes back, they change the aircraft registration. According to Sebastian White, spokesperson for JetBlue, that’s why ships 507, 508, 526, 527, 531, and 537 end in either JT or JL. They ended in JB until they were leased out to Blue Wings in Europe. It changed when they came back.

Mesa
Original Photo By DearEdward from New York, NY, USA (United's first E175) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Original Photo By DearEdward from New York, NY, USA (United’s first E175) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons


Mesa seems to be all over the map with its registration schemes. These days, it takes airplanes and gives them an NxxxLR registration which I think is for the airline’s founder Larry Risley. I assume the MJ stands for Mesa Jet and the FJ stands for Freedom Jet since Freedom was a former subsidiary that’s now gone. But you’ll notice the Embraer 175s use United’s registration scheme (the ## stands for random numbers). That’s because those airplanes are owned by United but given to Mesa to operate on the airline’s behalf.
  • Embraer 175
    • N##3xx
  • CRJ-700
    • N5xxMJ (xx = 01 to 15)
    • N5xxLR (xx = 16 and higher)
  • CRJ-900
    • N2xxLR (former Alitalia and Pluna aircraft)
    • N3xxMS (former HeavyLift aircraft)
    • N9xxFJ (xx = 01 to 25)
    • N9xxLR (xx = 26 and higher)
Republic (including Chautauqua and Shuttle America)

Republic has a lot of airplanes at three different subsidiaries. You can really trace the history behind some of these airplanes based on their registrations and on industry changes. You can also see that after the airline adopted the former Midwest Airlines YX code, it started changing its registration strategy.
  • Q400
    • N1xxWQ (former Colgan aircraft)
    • N2xxWQ (former Colgan aircraft)
    • N3xxNG (former Colgan aircraft)
    • N5xxLX (former Lynx aircraft)
  • Embraer 170
    • N8xxMD (former MidAtlantic aircraft)
  • Embraer 175
    • N1xxHQ (xx = 01 to 38)
    • N4xxYX
  • Embraer 190
    • N1xxHQ (xx = 63 to 77)

Chautauqua is not long for this world. It’s going to be merged into Shuttle America now that its partner airlines don’t need to keep some airplanes on separate certificates. Though many of the registrations end in SK, this doesn’t appear to be due to SkyWest. The best I can figure, this is because Skyways Aviation leased airplanes to Chautauqua. And I really don’t know where the JQ comes from. There are two outliers here, N974MP and N976RP. Those appear to be Embraer 145MP versions, so they’re just the black sheep of the family (the rest are LRs).

  • ERJ-140/145
    • N2xxJQ
    • NxxxSK
    • N5xxRP

Lastly we have Shuttle America. This airline has had nine lives, but now as a subsidiary of Republic that’s about to absorb Chautauqua, its long term prospects are solid.

  • Embraer 170
    • N6xxRW
    • N8xxRW
    • N8xxMD (former MidAtlantic aircraft)
  • Embraer 175
    • N2xxJQ
Silver
Original Photo By Is3cm (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Original Photo By Is3cm (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons


Silver is a newly-all Saab operator and it has two registrations. It picked up all its airplanes from Mesaba, which is now defunct.
  • Saab SF-340
    • N3xxAG (former Mesaba aircraft)
    • N4xxXJ (former Mesaba aircraft)
SkyWest (including ExpressJet)

SkyWest is probably the hardest regional to decipher. It has taken so many airplanes from so many other operators without re-registering that it ends up being quite the motley assortment. Let’s see if I can make some sense of this.
  • Embraer 120
    • N2xxSW
    • N2xxYV (former Mesa aircraft)
    • N5xxSW
  • CRJ-100/200
    • N4xxSW
    • N4xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N5xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N5xxML (former Midway aircraft)
    • N6xxBR(former Atlantic Coast aircraft)
    • N7xxBR (former Atlantic Coast aircraft)
    • N7xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N8xxAS (former Atlantic Southeast aircraft)
    • N8xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N9xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N9xxEV (former Atlantic Southeast aircraft
    • N9xxSW
  • CRJ-700
    • N6xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxQX (former Horizon aircraft)
    • N6xxSK
    • N7xxSK
  • CRJ-900
    • N1xxPQ (former Pinnacle aircraft)
    • N2xxAG (former Horizon aircraft)
    • N5xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N8xxSK
  • Embraer 175
    • N1xxSY

As if that’s not enough, there’s SkyWest’s under-performing subsidiary ExpressJet. (This is a combo of ExpressJet and the old Atlantic Southeast.) They’ve also picked up their share of airplanes from a variety of different places. The Embraers were all owned by Continental previously, so they follow the current United scheme with the ## being random numbers.

  • Embraer 135
    • N##5xx (xx = 01 to 30)
  • Embraer 145LR
    • N##5xx (xx = 31 and higher)
    • N##9xx
  • Embraer 145XR
    • N##1xx
    • N##2xx
  • CRJ-200
    • N4xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxBR (former Atlantic Coast aircraft)
    • N8xxAS (former Atlantic Southeast aircraft)
    • N9xxEV (former Atlantic Southeast aircraft)
  • CRJ-700
    • N3xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxQX (former Horizon aircraft)
    • N7xxEV (former Atlantic Southeast aircraft)
  • CRJ-900
    • N1xxEV (former Atlantic Southeast aircraft)
    • N1xxPQ (former Pinnacle aircraft)
    • N2xxPQ (former Pinnacle aircraft)
    • N5xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxLR (former Mesa aircraft)
Spirit

Unlike Allegiant, Spirit takes new aircraft, so I figured it would have everything in a neat order. It does. I assume the A319s and A321s share the same ranges because the A319s will be phased out over time.
  • A319
    • N5xxNK (xx = 01 to 34)
  • A320
    • N6xxNK
  • A321
    • N5xxNK (xx = 35 and higher)
Sun Country
Original Photo By DearEdward from New York, NY, USA [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Original Photo By DearEdward from New York, NY, USA [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons


You forgot about Sun Country, didn’t you?
  • 737-700
    • N7xxSY
  • 737-800
    • N8xxSY
Trans States (including Compass and GoJet)
Original Photo By Konstantin Von Wedelstaedt [GFDL 1.2 or GFDL 1.2], via Wikimedia Commons

Original Photo By Konstantin Von Wedelstaedt [GFDL 1.2 or GFDL 1.2], via Wikimedia Commons


Trans States is one strange airline. I always figured it would get acquired by someone, but so far it has only grown. The namesake airline only operates 50 seaters, and they all end in HK. Why? The founder’s name is Hulas Kanodia. Talk about an ego trip.
  • N8xxHK

Trans States started GoJet once it needed a new operator for larger aircraft. These have more traditional registrations.

  • CRJ-700
    • N1xxGJ
    • N3xxCA (former Comair aircraft)
    • N6xxCA (former Comair aircraft)

When Delta acquired Compass as a subsidiary of Northwest, it wanted to get rid of it. Trans States stepped in and offered to buy the airline. I’m not sure how Compass ended up with CZ, but it was probably as close as the airline could get and still find a good range of numbers that it needed.

  • Embraer 170
    • N7xxCZ
  • Embraer 175
    • N5xxCZ
Virgin America
Original Photo By Alan Wilson from Weston, Spalding, Lincs, UK (Airbus A320-214 'N623VA' Virgin America) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Original Photo By Alan Wilson from Weston, Spalding, Lincs, UK (Airbus A320-214 ‘N623VA’ Virgin America) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons


I always thought Virgin America would be easy with only A319s and A320s, but according to spokesperson Abby Lunardini, there’s more to it than that.
  • A319
    • N5xxVA
  • A320
    • N3xxVA (146 seats and sharklets)
    • N6xxVA (149 seats and standard wingtip fences)
    • N8xxVA (146 seats and standard wingtip fences)

There you have it. This isn’t an entirely comprehensive guide to all airlines in the US, but combined with last week’s post on the 4 biggest airlines in the US, this guide covers most US airlines you’re likely to fly.

read more "Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About US Airline Tail Numbers (Part 2)"

Monday, October 20, 2014

The Dyson humidifier cleans your air with ultraviolet light

Dyson doesn't enter new product categories all that often, but today we're seeing the second in less than two months. Following the September introduction of the 360 Eye robot vacuum, Dyson is now unveiling its first humidifier, simply called the Dyson humidifier. It'll look a lot more familiar than the 360 Eye, however; it's an evolution of the iconic Air Multiplier line of bladeless fans. Dyson says the emphasis is on hygiene and even distribution of air, with its humidifier cleaning water...

Continue reading…

read more "The Dyson humidifier cleans your air with ultraviolet light"

The World's Largest Battery-Electric Vehicle Is This Articulated Bus

The World's Largest Battery-Electric Vehicle Is This Articulated Bus

If when you think of electric vehicles you picture tiny lightweight cars designed to maximize their battery life, BYD Motors is about to blow your mind. At the recent 2014 American Public Transportation Association Expo in Houston, the company revealed a new articulated bus that it's claiming is the world's largest battery electric vehicle—unless the new Chevy Volt can accommodate 120 passengers.

Read more...








read more "The World's Largest Battery-Electric Vehicle Is This Articulated Bus"

China to Pass United States As Largest Passenger Market, Says IATA

By Benét J. Wilson / Published October 20th, 2014

A China Eastern Airbus A330. Photo courtesy of Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren / Airchive 2014

A China Eastern Airbus A330. Photo courtesy of Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren / Airchive 2014

World passenger numbers are expected to reach 7.3 billion by 2034, with annual average growth of 4.1 percent, according to the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) first-ever 20-year passenger growth forecast. Numbers are expected to be double that of the 3.3. billion passengers who will travel in 2014.

The new report, from the new IATA Passenger Forecasting service and partner Tourism Economics, analyzes passenger flows across 4,000 country pairs for the next 20 years by using three key demand drivers: living standards, population and demographics, and price and availability.

Despite China passing the U.S. in passengers, both markets are expected to remain the largest by a wide margin. In 2034, flights to, from and within China will account for some 1.3 billion passengers, 856 million more than 2014 with an average annual growth rate of 5.5 percent.

The United States will remain the largest air passenger market until around 2030, when it will drop to number two, behind China. Cumulatively over the next 20 years the U.S. will carry 18.3 billion more passengers and China 16.9 billion.

India, currently the ninth-largest market, will reach 367 million passengers by 2034, up 266 million annual passengers compared to 2014. It will overtake the United Kingdom, which will have 148 million extra passengers and a total market of 337 million, making it the third-largest market around 2031.

Brazil will increase passenger numbers by 170 million and rise from tenth to fifth, for a total market of 272 million passengers. Indonesia will enter the top ten around 2020 and reach sixth place by 2029. By 2034, it will be a market of 270 million passengers.

Reflecting a declining and aging population, Japan’s air passenger numbers will grow by only 1.3 percent per year and drop from the fourth-largest market in 2014 to the ninth-largest by 2033. Germany and Spain will decline from their fifth and sixth positions, respectively, in 2014 to be the eighth and seventh largest markets. France will fall from seventh to tenth while Italy will fall out of the top 10 in around 2019.

Broken down by regions, the report found that routes to, from and within Asia-Pacific will see an extra 1.8 billion annual passengers by 2034, for an overall market size of 2.9 billion. North America will grow by 3.3 percent annually and in 2034 will carry 1.4 billion passengers, while Europe will have the slowest growth rate, at 2.7 percent, but will still handle an additional 591 million passengers a year for a total market of 1.4 billion passengers.

Latin American markets will grow by 4.7 percent, serving a total of 605 million passengers, an additional 363 million passengers annually compared to 2014. The Middle East will grow strongly by 4.9 percent and will see an extra 237 million passengers a year on routes to, from and within the region by 2034. Finally, Africawill grow by 4.7 percent, and by 2034, it will see an extra 177 million passengers a year for a total market of 294 million passengers.

At present, aviation helps sustain 58 million jobs and $2.4 trillion in economic activity. In 20 years’ time we can expect aviation to be supporting around 105 million jobs and $6 trillion in GDP,” said Tony Tyler, IATA’s Director General and CEO in a press release. “Meeting the potential demand will require government policies that support the economic benefits that growing connectivity makes possible. Airlines can only fly where there is infrastructure to accommodate them. People can only fly as long as ticket taxes don’t price them out of their seats. And air connectivity can only thrive when nations open their skies and their markets. It’s a virtuous circle.”

Additional Aviation Forecasts

Airbus, 2014-2033

Boeing, 2014-2033

FAA Aerospace Forecast, 2014-2033

—–

Contact the editor at benet.wilson@airways.com

read more "China to Pass United States As Largest Passenger Market, Says IATA"

Apple releases iOS 8.1 with Apple Pay

Apple’s iOS 8.1 update is now available to download. The biggest addition is the new Apple Pay service which goes live today alongside iOS 8.1. Apple Pay will allow iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad Air 2, and iPad mini 3 owners to pay for goods within compatible apps by simply swiping a finger with Touch ID. iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners will also be able to use their phones to tap card readers in participating stores to pay for goods using a combination of Touch ID and NFC. Apple Pay integrates into the existing Passbook feature on iOS 8.1, allowing you to setup and store credit and debit cards.

Apple Pay is available in the US today, and is expected to be made available in additional countries next year. More than 220,000 stores in...

Continue reading…

read more "Apple releases iOS 8.1 with Apple Pay"

McDonald's CIO says decision to support Apple Pay was "not difficult"

With Apple Pay set to go operational across 220,000 merchant locations today, McDonald's CIO Deborah Hall-Lefevre recently explained why the ubiquitous fast food chain was so willing to be an Apple Pay partner at launch. In a recent interview with...
read more "McDonald's CIO says decision to support Apple Pay was "not difficult""

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Air Force's mysterious space drone returns after two years in orbit

Following its longest-ever mission by far, the 11,000 pound X-37B unmanned spacecraft has returned to Earth bearing... well, we don't actually know. You see, after NASA and Boeing developed the craft (about a fifth the size of the Space Shuttle), it...
read more "Air Force's mysterious space drone returns after two years in orbit"

Saturday, October 18, 2014

NASA's Ames Opens Its Doors To The Public Tomorrow

NASA Ames
NASA

On October 18th, NASA Ames Research Center will celebrate its 75th anniversary by opening its doors to the public. It's a pretty big deal: A public walking tour of the campus hasn't happened since 1997, and the space agency expects 120,000 people to participate.

Nestled adjacent to the Googleplex and in the heart of Silicon Valley, NASA Ames at Moffett Field is a giant complex, where research for NASA's space program, among many other things, takes place. Below are some of the things attendees can see on the tour.


The Ames Research Center houses some pretty spectacular buildings; one that's highly visible from the street is the largest wind tunnel in the world. The Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is designed to test commercial and military aircraft and NASA space vehicles.

NASA’s only working 20G centrifuge, designed specifically to create artificial gravity for the machine's occupants is also at Ames. This particular centrifuge has imposed the harsh effects of gravity on humans, animals, microbes, and plants in preparation for the G-forces felt during take off and re-entry; some “mousetronauts” were tested here before their launch last month on SpaceX’s Dragon to the ISS.

The 20G Centrifuge
NASA

Another interesting lab, which won’t induce gravity loss of consciousness (G-LOC) or vomiting, is the thermophysics facility.

This lab houses the arc-jet, built to test different materials for reentry into the atmosphere. Functioning much like a garden hose of fire, the jet uses a stream of air that is accelerated to a velocity of 5 kilometers per second and sprayed over the material being tested. This creates a hypersonic shock wave of 10,000 degrees and heats the material to approximately what it would experience reentering the atmosphere of Earth or Mars.

The Arc Jet testing a material designed for entry into the Martian atmosphere
NASA

There are dozens of other exciting and science-fiction inspired experiments taking place at Ames, like SPHERES, and the Astrobiology Institute that studies the origins of life in the universe.

According to Sidney Sun, Chief of the Space Biosciences Division, “People are hungry for science, the public associates NASA with the future and exploration, and by coming to our open house they are getting a peek into the future. It’s exciting to get to share that.”

read more "NASA's Ames Opens Its Doors To The Public Tomorrow"

Friday, October 17, 2014

Retina iMac Teardown: New Face, Same Guts

Retina iMac Teardown: New Face, Same Guts

The folks over at iFixit have done their usual job of tearing exciting new bits of technology to pieces, this time with the new Retina iMac as their unlucky victim. Conclusion: apart from that pretty new screen, everything's more or less the same.

Read more...








read more "Retina iMac Teardown: New Face, Same Guts"

Awesome video illustrates how much Shanghai has changed over the years

Awesome video illustrates how much Shanghai has changed over the years

Over the past thirty years, few cities have undergone the transformation that Shanghai has. It went from a vertically challenged city filled with greenery to mutant New York on speed and steroids. Claire and Max illustrate how much has changed by eliminating the current buildings from the skyline and then drawing them in and putting them back.

Read more...








read more "Awesome video illustrates how much Shanghai has changed over the years"
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...